Corporate Media Allowed Net Neutrality to Die in Silence

The flagship morning news shows on broadcast and cable news covered net neutrality for less than four minutes combined.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today voted to repeal net neutrality rules, which will allow internet service providers to block or slow down service and access to websites, or charge fees for faster service.

If you weren’t aware of this potentially monumental change that will significantly impact your internet access, that’s because the major news networks mostly haven’t been doing their jobs.

Hours before today’s FCC repeal vote, the flagship morning news shows on the six major broadcast and cable news networks devoted an embarrassingly small amount of time to covering net neutrality. Relative silence from the major news networks on net neutrality is unfortunately nothing new, as Media Matters has previously documented.

This morning, most of the morning news programs either completely ignored the impending move or cursorily mentioned it for a few seconds at a time. Among the cable news networks, Fox News’ Fox & Friends spent just 52 seconds on net neutrality. MSNBC’s Morning Joe and CNN’s New Day did not cover the story at all. (It was covered for about half a minute on MSNBC’s early morning show, First Look, and roughly one minute on CNN’s early morning show, Early Start. After the conclusion of Morning Joe, MSNBC has been covering net neutrality in detail on MSNBC Live.)

The broadcast networks also spent scant time on the issue: ABC’s Good Morning America devoted just 14 seconds to net neutrality and NBC’s Today didn’t mention it at all. CBS This Morning led the pack with two and a half minutes of coverage this morning, and was the only one of the flagship morning programs to run a full segment on the topic.

Since November 28, cable news networks have mostly given net neutrality minimal coverage: approximately five minutes each on CNN and Fox News and almost 17 minutes on MSNBC, which has consistently devoted the most coverage to net neutrality in recent weeks. Broadcast networks have been mostly crickets, too. Since November 28, NBC has devoted about eight minutes to covering net neutrality while CBS has spent close to five minutes, and ABC has devoted just 14 seconds to the topic — the brief mention on Good Morning America this morning.

Since November 20, when news first broke about the planned repeal, the six networks have devoted a combined nearly one hour and 53 minutes to the story; although, MSNBC alone has accounted for more than one hour and three minutes of that total coverage time. The vast majority of the coverage occurred before November 28.

Under Trump, the Republican-led FCC has already done significant damage to the local news landscape and paved the way for major corporate consolidation in media — but repealing net neutrality seems to be its most unpopular action yet. A new survey found that 83 percent of Americans don’t approve of the FCC’s repeal proposal — including 3 out of 4 Republicans. Even the FCC’s own chief technology officer warned against the move. And 18 attorneys general had called for a delay in the vote due to widespread fraudulent comments during the public comment period.

That’s probably why chairman Ajit Pai’s media tour in the days before the net neutrality repeal has largely targeted conservative and far-right media that may provide a (marginally) more friendly audience. Since November 21, Pai has given four cable news interviews: two with Fox & Friends, one with Fox News’ Tucker Carlson, and a fourth with conservative talk radio host Hugh Hewitt at MSNBC. He did not give an interview to any of the three major broadcast networks. (Pai also seemingly promoted the repeal by appearing in an embarrassing video at The Daily Caller along with renowned plagiarist Benny Johnson and a Pizzagate conspiracy theorist.)

It’s also why major news networks’ relative silence on such a deeply unpopular and hugely consequential action like the FCC’s repeal vote is a net benefit to the commission and to major corporations — and keeps an informed public from fighting back.

Methodology

Media Matters searched the Snapstream database of television video transcripts for any mentions of “net neutrality,” “Federal Communications Commission,” or “FCC” from November 20 through December 14, 2017 on ABC’s Good Morning AmericaWorld News Tonight with David Muir, and This Week with George Stephanopoulos; CBS’s This Morning, Evening News, and Face the Nation with John Dickerson; NBC’s Today, Nightly News with Lester Holt, and Meet the Press with Chuck Todd; and all-day programming (through 9am on December 14) on the three major cable news networks — CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. We also searched the Nexis transcript database and the iQ Media transcript database for the same terms. Since November 23 was Thanksgiving, some networks altered their regularly scheduled programming on that day.

We included any segment about FCC chair Ajit Pai’s proposal or the FCC vote scheduled for December 14 following Politico’s November 20 report on the proposal. We timed all such segments from start to finish, and excluded any breaks to other news or to commercials. We also included portions of multi-topic segments when two or more speakers discussed the FCC chair’s proposal or the scheduled vote on the proposal with one another. In those instances, we only timed the relevant discussion and not the entire segment. We excluded passing mentions of the proposal or its vote, and we excluded teasers of upcoming segments about the proposal or its vote.

Note: This post has been updated to reflect that the FCC officially moved to repeal net neutrality rules in a 3-2 vote on December 14. 

Rob Savillo contributed research to this report. Charts by Sarah Wasko.

 

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The NBA 2K franchise back with NBA 2K18 now in the Play Store

2K, Inc

  • NBA 2K18, the newest entry in the iconic franchise, is now on the Play Store
  • The game includes updated mechanics, an expanded script in career mode, and a new game mode
  • The soundtrack features artists like Kendrick Lamar, Naughty by Nature, and Nas

It’s never been a better time to be a sports fan with a smartphone. Not only are there an endless amount of apps like theScore and 365 Sports that keep you up to date on your teams, but sports games are getting better and better. Most of the important sports franchises are available as mobile versions now. The list includes ultra-popular titles like Madden, Fifa, NBA 2K18 and more.

The latest version of NBA 2K just hit the Play Store with a ton of improvements over last year’s version. New features like an improved MyCAREER mode and “The Association” mode join an improved soundtrack. In the updated career mode, the script has been expanded and more interactions are available for your player. Association Mode is a new multi-season mode that reminds us a lot of Dynasty Mode from other games. 

See also

Music has always been a staple of sports games and it’s no different for NBA 2K18. 2K promises an “eclectic mix” of music with artists like Future, Kendrick Lamar, Shakira, Nas and more. Gameplay controls are now improved and new gameplay mechanics like sprinting on defense are now included in the game. 

2K came under fire earlier this year for the console version of NBA 2K. The game is packed with microtransactions for everything from improving your career mode player to giving your player a new haircut. Sadly, it looks like the mobile version is no different. On top of the $7.99 price tag, NBA 2K18 features in-app purchases that range all the way up to $49.99. Ouch.

People don’t seem to mind, though, because the game currently sits at a 4.0 rating on the Play Store. There are only about 250 reviews so that may change, but we’ll have to wait to find out. If you want to check out NBA 2K18, hit the button below.

get it at google play

Learn the Bootstrap Grid in 15 Minutes : BootStrap – ResponSive Designing

Bootstrap grid system

Bootstrap is a free and open-source front-end web framework for designing websites and web applications. Unlike many web frameworks, it concerns itself with front-end development only. Anybody who knows HTML, CSS and a bit of Java Script can learn Bootstrap in no time. Responsive page layout is the layout which can change and adapt depending on the screen size of the device the user is on.

The grid consists of rows and columns. This allows us to freely position elements vertically and horizontally. Rows are block level. This means, that when we create a row, it takes up the entire width of the element it is in. You can think of rows as new lines in your layout. The horizontal alignment in the grid is done via columns. Only columns can be the direct children of a row and all content should go inside them. Placing content directly within a row will break the layout.
        
Syntax for the Bootstrap grid system:


<div class="row">


<div class="col-md-12">Content Goes Here</div>

</div>      
Rows are divided horizontally into 12 equal parts. When we place a column inside a row, we have to specify the number of parts it is going to take up. 
        
This is done by using special class .col-md-NUMBER , here Number can be 1 to 12 depending on the width of the element getting placed in that column.

components of the grid system
 
In the class name .col-md-NUMBER  md stands for medium display size. To make the page responsive we use different classes because bootstrap uses the screen resolution and dpi into account when deciding which classes are active. This is a powerful way how to control how layouts render on different devices. 


classes used in bootstrap


To make it responsive according to screen size we use :


<div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6"><p> To learn Angular JS and BootStrap visit http://monster.suvenconsultants.com/#section-angularJs-Bootsrtap . </p></div>


<div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6">Content</div>

output for the code where desktop will show elements horizontally and in mobile it will view vertical



Clearfix :
In some scenarios, when a column has much more content and a bigger height then the ones after it, the layout will break. The columns will all pile up under each other, instead of moving to the next line as they should. To make the page look perfectly aligned we use clearifix.

syntax to use clearfix:

<div class="row">
<div class="col-xs-6 tall-column">A column much taller than the rest.</div>
<div class="col-xs-6"></div>
<div class="clearfix"></div>
<div class="col-xs-6"></div>
</div>

even if the height is different next element will display on the next row


Offsets :
By default, columns stick to each other without leaving any space, floating to the left. Any excess space remaining in that row stays empty on the right. to leave space on the left side we use offsets
classes used in offsets


Example for offsets:

<div class="container">
<div class="row">
<div class="col-xs-5 col-xs-offset-4">col-xs-5 col-xs-offset-4</div>
<div class="col-xs-9 col-xs-offset-2">col-xs-9 col-xs-offset-2</div>
<div class="col-xs-6 col-xs-offset-1">col-xs-6 col-xs-offset-1</div>
<div class="col-xs-4 col-xs-offset-1">col-xs-4 col-xs-offset-1</div>
<div class="col-xs-11 col-xs-offset-1">col-xs-11 col-xs-offset-1</div>
<div class="col-xs-10">col-xs-10</div>
<div class="col-xs-7">col-xs-7</div> </div>
<div class="row"> <div class="col-xs-5">col-xs-5</div> </div>
<div class="row">
<div class="col-xs-7">col-xs-7</div>
<div class="col-xs-10">col-xs-10</div>
<div class="col-xs-11 col-xs-offset-1">col-xs-11 col-xs-offset-1</div>
<div class="col-xs-11 col-xs-offset-1">col-xs-11 col-xs-offset-1</div>
<div class="col-xs-9 col-xs-offset-2">col-xs-9 col-xs-offset-2</div>
<div class="col-xs-5 col-xs-offset-4">col-xs-5 col-xs-offset-4</div>
</div> </div>


   


offset will keep the blank space on left side


To make it more clear:


CONCLUSION:
Great job! You now know the most important part of the Bootstrap framework, and you’re ready to build your next responsive design. Interested in learning bootstrap ?  . 

Huawei, OPPO, and Vivo all slash smartphone orders by over 10%

  • Huawei, OPPO, and Vivo are all cutting smartphone orders by over 10% in Q4 2017.
  • The companies are sitting on more and more inventory as worldwide smartphone demand has dropped.
  • Xiaomi is still performing well despite the struggle of fellow Chinese device manufacturers.

One of the smartphone trends that might have flown under the radar in 2017 is the explosion of Chinese cell phone manufactures. While they have been steadily growing for years, this was the year that companies like Xiaomi were able to top Samsung in the important market of India. Huawei is the world’s third largest device manufacturer and occasionally tops Apple for second and OPPO and Vivo (both owned by BBK) are both in the top three in China.

Editor’s Pick

To say it has been a good year for these companies would be an understatement. But, it looks like Huawei, OPPO, and Vivo are preparing for a slower start to 2018. According to a report from DigiTimes, the three companies are cutting smartphone orders by over 10%. The information comes from sources at suppliers for the trio of companies.

As demand for new smartphones falls, the companies are now sitting on more and more inventory.

The one company that seems to be immune from the slowdown is Xiaomi. The company continues to be bullish in both online and retail environments. Xiaomi is continuing its surge in India, which saw it overtake Samsung in the country. India looks to be an interesting battleground for 2018 as Samsung and Xiaomi battle it out at the top and Huawei looks to increase its presence.

See also: Report: Samsung’s global market share will fall in 2018

Xiaomi and Huawei are also both expected to increase their presence in the United States next year. Rumors of the Huawei Mate 10 Pro’s release on Verizon and AT&T have heated up recently and Xiaomi is reportedly in talks with US carriers to carry its phones as well, according to Bloomberg.

Despite cutting orders, it looks like 2018 is shaping up to be a good year for Chinese smartphone manufacturers.

The One Scenario in Which Trump Would Risk Impeachment and Fire Robert Mueller

The president reportedly expects to be exonerated soon.

President Donald Trump believes that special counsel Robert Mueller will soon send him a letter that completely exonerates him of any wrongdoing — but the president’s allies fear that such a letter will never come.

CNN reports that Trump has recently been boasting to allies that the Russia probe will be over very shortly, and that Mueller will personally exonerate him. The president believes this, CNN’s sources say, because his attorneys have tried to manage him by telling him that he faces no real danger from the probe.

However, some of the president’s allies believe this is delusional, wishful thinking — and they fear what Trump will do if that exoneration letter never comes.

One Trump ally tells CNN that the president will likely have a “meltdown” after months go by without an exoneration letter, after which “he’ll try and fire Mueller and then be impeached.”

Another Trump ally similarly warns that Trump’s lawyers are playing a dangerous game by buttering him up with happy talk about the Mueller probe ending shortly.

“I’ve known him long enough to know that disappointing him is a problem and they’ve built up a level of expectations for him that are unrealistic,” the source said. “[They’ve] lulled him into a false sense of security.”

 

 

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Sand in my story

I don’t believe in black and white. 99.9% of everything is a shade of grey, and absolutes are at best naive simplifications and at worst dangerous traps. That is not a very trendy opinion. To my great despair the internet has not led to people to discuss their differences, but has isolated them into echo chambers where black and white are the only colors available. Whether it is politics, culture, or gaming, nobody wants to discuss the pros and cons of any issue any more, they just want shared outrage at whatever they believe is wrong. This is why blogging is in decline and tweeting is on top, Twitter just does outrage so much better.

In spite of these modern trends, I’m still trying to discuss issues, especially in gaming, by looking at them from both sides. And today I would like to talk about sandboxes and linear stories in Dungeons & Dragons, especially in the official Wizards of the Coast published adventures. Now none of them are perfect sandboxes or completely linear, as neither of the extreme cases works very well in pen & paper roleplaying. But if we compare the shades of grey of today with the shades of grey from the past, the current selection of adventures since the release of 5th edition is way more on the sandbox side as adventure modules from previous editions were.

The sandbox style has certain advantages. I believe that the best 4th edition adventure that Wizards of the Coast released for Dungeons & Dragons is Madness at Gardmore Abbey, which is more sandbox than the other 4E adventures. And so I am currently playing a 5E adaptation. However from the adventure books that WotC released in 5th edition my favorites are the Lost Mines of Phandelver from the Starter Set and Curse of Strahd, and both of these are more linear story than the others. My experience with the more sandbox adventures isn’t so good: As a player I watched a less experienced dungeon master flounder with Out of the Abyss; I spent hours to prepare Storm King’s Thunder, only to finally give up because the adventure was just too bad; and the Princes of the Apocalypse took me many hours of rewriting and changing into something a bit more linear in order to make it playable.

Much of the problem is one of presentation. A computer has no problems running a sandbox game, because he has perfect memory. In a game of D&D the information has to go from the adventure book into the head of the dungeon master first, before it can then be told at the table to the players. Humans don’t have perfect memory, and our brains can more easily remember stories than lists of unconnected facts. Human DMs are simply better at stories than they are at sandboxes. Madness at Gardmore Abbey works because it is basically a collection of stories which can be tackled in any order you like. That freedom makes it feel like a sandbox to the players, but the story content is easy to remember for the DM. When I prepare a session for Princes of the Apocalypse, for example my players currently breaking into Rivergard Keep, the presentation of the place by location number and the bits and pieces of story being distributed all over the location descriptions makes finding the stories much harder. I need to read every location back to front, locate the story bits, then read them again to puzzle them together, and finally find where the book simply doesn’t provide much explanation or story and invent some of my own.

I do like the fact that a place like Rivergard Keep has many different options for the players to tackle it. I’ve looked at YouTube videos of people playing that part of the adventure for inspiration, and various groups have done everything from negotiation, to charming the door guard, to infiltration by water, to frontal assault for this “dungeon”. But a better presentation of the power dynamics in that place and their likely response to attacks sure would have helped: In those YouTube videos I also saw DMs overdoing the response, ending with a near total party kill, and some improbable Deus-ex-machina intervention which saved the party but severely mauled the overall story and credibility.

Talking of credibility, I found that many WotC adventures of the sandbox style have a serious problem with experience points and levels. Fundamentally WotC is cheating: If you add up the experience points in Princes of the Apocalypse (the only one for which I have actually done the exercise, but I’m sure the problem is the same for the others) and apply WotC’s own level by experience points table, you fall far short of the levels required in the adventure. WotC sells you an adventure that says “level 1 – 15” on the back, but doesn’t actually have enough content in it to actually get a group from level 1 to 15 if you play by their own rules. The “fix” is a so-called milestones system in which the group gains a level at the end of a dungeon in order to have enough levels to tackle the next dungeon. However such a milestones system only works really well with a linear story and order of dungeons; it falls flat in a sandbox adventure where people can do the dungeons out of order, or do them only partially at one visit to come back another time. In my own campaign I had to double the regular monster xp and hand out bonus xp for certain story achievements in order to make the level system work. If I hadn’t done that, the latter dungeons of the adventure would have become quite impossible to beat.

Overall I believe that the focus on sandbox elements in WotC published adventures is more one of ideology or marketing than one of good game design. The result is that for many of these books as a DM you can’t just take the book and start playing. Even as an experienced dungeon master you need quite a lot of hours of preparation time to first understand all the elements in the book in spite of their chaotic presentation, and then to modify them in order to make them actually work. There is a huge gap in the offer between the very well done Starter Set adventure that can be played by a first time DM with no problem and the following books that can drive even an experienced DM to despair. For an edition which is designed to bring a lot new players and dungeon masters into the game, there really is something missing here.

Xiaomi’s Mi A1 Special Edition in Red is coming to India (updated)

Update (12/19/17): The gorgeous Xiaomi Mi A1 Special Edition is officially coming to India. Beginning December 20, customers will have the chance to order the Red version of the Mi A1 from Mi.com and Flipkart’s online store. Additionally, the device will be available from Mi Home stores, Mi preferred partner stores, and other retail partners. The device will run customers Rs. 13,999.

December 20 is also the start of Xiaomi’s “No. 1 Fan Sale” in the country. Xiaomi is celebrating its fans with sales on phones like the Xiaomi Mi MIX 2, Mi Max 2, Redmi 4, Redmi Note 4, and Redmi Y1 Lite. The Mi MIX 2 will see a price drop from Rs. 35,999 to Rs. 32,999, while the Mi Max 2 will drop from Rs. 14,999 to Rs. 12,999. The Redmi 4 gets a Rs. 1,000 discount, while pricing details for the Redmi Note 4 and Redmi Y1 Lite have yet to be released yet.

You can get check out all of the deals on Mi.com starting December 20.


Original article (12/14/17): It seems like red has caught on as a color of choice for smartphones, since OnePlus and Samsung have red versions of their flagship smartphones. Whether it’s because of that, or whether it’s because it’s the season for such a color, Xiaomi has joined the fray with the Mi A1 Special Edition.

Don’t let the name fool you; the only thing special about the Mi A1 Special Edition is the red color it comes in. That being said, the shade of red looks much less like Samsung’s Burgundy Red and more like OnePlus’ Lava Red, with the color choice meant to stand out than be more subtle.

Either way, it comes across as vibrant and stunning, with the added red color meaning that the Mi A1 is now available in four colors.

Elsewhere, the Mi A1 Special Edition remains identical to the normal Mi A1. In other words, you’ll find a 5.5-inch Full HD display, with a 5 MP camera up front and dual 12 MP cameras around back. Under the hood, Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 625 chipset and 4 GB of RAM power the phone, and while the processor might be a bit long in the tooth at this point, it allows for greater battery efficiency.

Editor’s Pick

That efficiency is what helps give the Mi A1 very good battery life in our testing, regardless of the modest 3,080 mAh battery. If the 64 GB of internal storage is not enough for your needs, the microSD card slot allows for up to 128 GB of additional storage.

Finally, the Mi A1’s story revolves around its status as one of the handful of Android One devices out there, which means that the phone runs stock Android 7.1.2 Nougat. That makes the phone the only Xiaomi smartphone that runs stock Android out of the box, something that slightly disoriented us at first but that we eventually got used to.

According to GizmoChina, which spotted the phone, the Mi A1 Special Edition is currently available in Indonesia for 3.099.000 rupiahs, which translate to roughly $228. There is no word if the phone will be available in other markets, though we’ll keep an eye out if it does.

The culture war is a deliberate distraction

Capitalism is the best economic system for the overall creation of wealth. However it is lousy at distributing that wealth fairly between the people who contributed to the creation; and it equally sucks at all other issues which require solidarity (e.g. health care) or involve the common good (e.g. the environment). After WWII it appeared that the first world countries had solved that problem: They had all created political systems in which “the right” fought for freedom and capitalism, and “the left” fought for fair distribution, solidarity, and the common good. Alternating between left and right governments created a balance, and even allowed different countries to arrive at different points on that balance, e.g. Scandinavian countries having more solidarity, and the US having more capitalism.

However the system had one inherent flaw: Politicians are by definition members of the elite, the ruling class. And that is true for left wing politicians as well. Thus a right wing politician fighting for unfettered capitalism that makes the rich richer and the poor poorer was both following his party politics and his own greed. While the left wing elite was naturally less inclined to fight for policies that aided less well off, because it didn’t help them personally. So at various points in the 90’s the left wings in different countries simply gave up on economic policy for fairer distribution of wealth, and just joined the capitalist camp which made the elite richer. Today a left wing politician like Bernie Sanders or Jeremy Corbyn who still push for some economic fairness and solidarity are considered as “odd” and decried as “communists”.

Now this has created a growing rift between voters and the elite that leads them in politics and media. The people simply isn’t represented any more. They are being fed lies like “your salaries are only low because of immigrants” or “tax cuts for the rich will trickle down to you”. In their desperation they increasingly vote for extremists and populists, and end up harming themselves even more through the resulting policies. And the left and right wing elite in order to be seen to do something play acts a culture war to distract the masses from the real problems.

In Germany there is an organization of soup kitchens which collect food past its sell-by-date and distributes it to people who are so poor that they have to beg for food. One local organization recently made headlines because they enacted a controversial “Germans first” policy, after food fights had broken out in which younger male immigrants shoved aside elderly German grandmothers. And the discussion is all about the culture war, with the left fighting for equal rights for the immigrants, and the right defending priority for the natives. Only the extreme left is mentioning the real problem: That in one of the world’s richest countries, at the top of the economic cycle and full employment, there are still so many people having to beg for old food that the soup kitchens can’t feed all of them.

As Bill Clinton still knew, “it’s the economy, stupid”. If the centrist parties fail to represent the economic interests of the majority of the population, they will fade into irrelevance. History repeats itself, and the rise of populist parties in Europe in the 1930’s (not just in Germany) isn’t really the example we would want the world to follow. We need to see the culture was as the distraction that it is, and concentrate on the real economic problems.

Advanced Excel Charts: Sooo Muuch Data – Analysis Needed !

Data visualization is the presentation of data in a pictorial or graphical format.

Today, we see data visualization being embraced like never before. Organizations that know and understand it, love its very existence. Since Big Data is a popular lingo in the tech world today across industries ranging from finance to communications, the need to drive better business decisions is the need of the hour. As a result, organizations are looking for better data visualization tools, to turn their essential load of data into something that is more comprehensible.
Excel charts are an efficient means to visualize the data to convey the results. In addition to the chart types that are available in Excel, some application charts are popular and widely used.
The importance of advanced charts
  • They provide consolidated information in a single chart that makes it easier to compare more than one data set and make decisions quickly
  • They allow us to customize the look and feel of the charts
Lets see some important Advanced Charts in Excel:

1. Band Chart

A Band chart is a Line chart with added shaded areas to display the upper and lower boundaries of the defined data ranges.
Band charts provide by far more context to your visualization and more insight into your data. Especially if you have to explore unknown data sets.

Why is a band chart more efficient than a line chart? Because it provides more context. Unlike a single line chart displaying only the development of the selected data series over time, a band chart provides a variety of additional information at a glance.

2. Waffle Chart:

A Waffle chart is a square divided by 10×10 cells. The value is displayed as percentage, so you can clearly see the difference down to 1%.
Pie charts are often criticized because while at the outset they do seem to convey the information, people still have a hard time comparing the angles and sizes of each element.
Making pie healthier resulted in the Waffle chart! A Waffle chart is essentially a squarified pie. Since it does not involve angles, it’s easier for the reader to compare accurately as well as evoke emotional comparisons.
You can use it with just one measure…
or with a category.


3.Heat Map

A Heat Map is a visual representation of data in a Table to highlight the data points of significance.
For example, in the dataset below, I can easily spot which are the months when the sales were low (highlighted in red) as compared with other months.
In the above dataset, the colors are assigned based on the value in the cell. The color scale is Green to Yellow to Red with high values getting the green color and low values getting the red color.

4.Waterfall Chart:

A Waterfall chart is a form of data visualization that helps in understanding the cumulative effect of sequentially introduced positive or negative values.
The columns are color coded so you can quickly tell positive from negative numbers. The initial and the final value columns often start on the horizontal axis, while the intermediate values are floating columns. Because of this “look”, waterfall charts are also called bridge charts.

5.Pareto Chart:

Pareto chart is widely used in Statistical Analysis for decision-making.It represents the Pareto principle, also called 80/20 Rule, which states that 80% of the results are due to 20% of the causes.
A Pareto or sorted histogram chart contains both columns sorted in descending order and a line representing the cumulative total percentage. Pareto charts highlight the biggest factors in a data set, and are considered one of the seven basic tools of quality control as it’s easy to see the most common problems or issues.

Want to learn Data Analytics?

First impressions Zortrax M200 Plus 3D Printer

I am going to post a full review with comparison of things I printed later, but I already wanted to write about my first impressions with my new 3D printer. Unboxing the printer, installing, calibration, and starting to print took me about 1 hour, which is about a “plug & play” as it gets in 3D printing. Most of the printer is pre-assembled, but you need to assemble the cable to the print head and the cable to the heated bed yourself, as well as the spool holder and the guide tube from the spool to the print head. Then you need to install the latest firmware via an USB key, and calibrate the bed to be even. That is done with the help of 3 screws, with the printer telling you which one to turn by how much. Apart from a ridiculous degree of precision in the instructions (“turn the screw by 86.02°”), that went smoothly.

The printer comes with one model for a test print on the provided USB key. In a disappointing display of lack of professionalism Zortrax managed to forget to include supports in that test print model, which results in it being actually impossible to print. Of course I didn’t know that and went back to the shop to ask why after installation the test print wasn’t working, and it was just by chance that there was a technician present who was aware of that issue and told me not to worry and print something else instead.

Both the firmware and the Z-Suite 3D printing software can only be downloaded after entering the serial number of the printer, but then the software worked on the first try. So I printed a 3D Benchy as test print, and it came out very nice. Much better detail on the fine parts, and smoother walls. However after printing some other models I have to say that not everything is perfect, and some prints that I succeeded with on the old printer failed to print on the new one; right now it is hard to say how much of that is due to the change in material from PLA to ABS, how much is related to finding the best settings, and how much is due to the printer.

What I really disliked about my old XYZ printer was that he would only take spools of PLA from the company that made the printer, with an RFID chip in the spool making sure you didn’t use other material. That system also resulted in the spool physically still having several meters of material on it at the end, while the RFID chip claimed the spool was empty and refused to use it any more. The new Zortrax printer is better in that respect, you can print with spools from any supplier. However the software has the optimum parameters for the Zortrax spools, while for external materials you need to find the best settings yourself. That curiously means that if you want to print the Zortrax ABS at a different temperature for some reason, you need to unload it, and reload it as external material, claiming it was ABS from a different supplier.

I notice a real change printing in ABS rather than in PLA. I will need to explore that further, and for example try to print PLA on the new printer. The previous model Zortrax M200 was famous for not doing PLA well, but the M200 Plus has an additional cooling fan on the print head and is supposed to have solved that problem. From a scientific point of view, PLA is more crystalline, which makes it more shiny, but also more brittle. ABS is more matte, more flexible, and sturdier. Lego bricks are made from ABS, and those usually don’t break easily. However when printed with a 3D printer, the layers create a preferred axis of breakage, so if I would print a Lego brick it would be less sturdy than the original. And it would be less glossy and smooth on the surface. However ABS, unlike PLA, is soluble in acetone, so there are methods of making ABS printed parts smooth and glossy by exposing them to acetone vapors. I haven’t tried that yet. The disadvantage I noticed with ABS is that you need to print it at higher temperature to make it stick to the previous layer, and then there is a bit of possible “sagging”, making the printed part a bit broader than the model. I had some prints of figurines with supports where the side of the support stuck to the side of the model, and then left a mark when I removed it. That can probably be fixed by the settings of the software making the supports.

Talking of supports, I still have the same problem with the supports generated by the Z-Suite software than I had with the supports generated by the XYZWare software: The supports are far too massive for small 28mm scale figurines. You can’t use them to print a support for something which is only a millimeter or two thick, like a weapon or arm of a miniature. They seem to be designed for large objects. Having said that, the Z-Suite software has at least some degree of manual editing of support structures, so that is good. Just for my main application I’ll keep using Meshmixer for building support structures for small figurines.

Finally there is one point where the new Zortrax printer is far worse than the old XYZ printer: The XYZ printer automatically shut down the light after a few minutes, and shut down the fans when the print head was cold. Thus I could start a print in the morning and go to work, or in the evening and go to bed, and when I came back the XYZ printer was on standby. The Zortrax printer doesn’t have that, when you come back hours later the light is still on (presumably to allow the internal camera to work) and the fans are still blowing, although the machine is cold. That adds unnecessary wear and tear to the fans, and also consumes more electricity when not in use. I think I will have to buy an electronic time switch or something.

Overall I am happy with the new printer, and I’ll show some photos of the improved results in a future post. But there remains a lot of fiddling and optimizing to be done, and the new printer didn’t miraculously and immediately solve all my printing problems. But then that would have been boring anyway! 🙂